Real vs. Fake Christmas Trees

Uncle says, NO PLASTIC TREES! Each holiday season news articles, web sites and commentators debate whether it is better for the environment to use a plastic artificial Christmas tree or a real Christmas tree. Uncle says “be green and buy real green”. A real Christmas tree is five times more environmentally compatible than a plastic artificial Christmas tree.

Real Christmas Trees for Sale at the Grass Pad

How Long Does a Real Christmas Tree Last?

With proper care, a real Christmas tree will last about five to six weeks indoors. To ensure the longest life from the tree, be sure to follow Uncle’s tips on Christmas tree preservation:

Remove Loose Needles – Through the natural growing process of evergreen trees, the tree will have pre-existing needle loss on interior branches. Tapping the tree trunk firmly against the ground and shaking it will remove most of the needles.

Reduce Needle Drop – Use Wilt-Pruf, an antitranspirant, to slow moisture evaporation from the needles. Before bringing the tree into the house, spray Wilt-Pruf to thoroughly coat needles to reduce premature needle loss.

Preserve Tree Moisture – Making sure the tree has water in the stand at all times will ensure that the tree lives as long as possible.

Use Uncle’s Tree Life Kit – This special formula is designed to feed your tree while it is in the stand. Place the tree into the stand or bucket within one hour of a fresh cut. Mix Tree Life with warm water at the recommended ratio and fill the stand or bucket. Check the solution every 8-12 hours for the first 3 days and re-fill to keep at max capacity.

Tree Placement – For maximum needle retention, place the fresh cut Christmas tree away from any home appliance or areas that produce heat or drafts. This includes fireplaces, radiators, vents and TVs or stereo systems.

Types of Real Christmas Trees

There are a couple types of Christmas trees available for sale at the Grass Pad – the different types work well for different situations. See below for more info about the types we will have in stock this year.

Oregon Noble Fir

– Most desired of all varieties
– Rich blue-ish green with a hint of silver
– Best for heavy ornaments
– Layered branching
– Pleasant aromatic scent
– Best needle retention
– Excellent for wreaths and garland

Northern Fraser Fir

– Popular value priced tree
– Open branching
– Dark blue-green needles
– Good for heavy ornaments
– Pleasant fragrance
– Good needle retention

Growing Real Christmas Trees
Real Grass Pad Christmas trees are 100% grown in the United States of America. Buying real Grass Pad Christmas trees helps local small businesses and and independent American farmers. There are about 21,000 Christmas tree growers in the United States, and over 100,000 people employed full or part-time in the industry. There are close to half a billion real Christmas trees currently growing on Christmas tree farms in the United States, all planted by farmers.
Farms that grow Christmas trees stabilize soil, protect water supplies and provide refuge for wildlife while creating scenic green belts. Often, Christmas trees are grown on soil that doesn’t support other crops.
Real Christmas Trees are a renewable resource. They are grown on farms just like any other crop. To ensure a constant supply, Christmas tree growers plant one to three seedlings for every tree they harvest. Real Christmas trees are 100% biodegradable and can be recycled into beneficial mulch or used for wildlife habitats.

There are more than 4,000 Christmas tree recycling programs throughout the United States. Plastic artificial Christmas trees are a petroleum-based, non-biodegradable product manufactured primarily in Chinese factories. Eighty percent (80%) of artificial Christmas trees worldwide are manufactured in China.

Real Christmas Trees: 

– Are Recyclable
– Are Biodegradable
– Are 100% Grown in the USA
– Absorb Carbon Dioxide
– Emit Oxygen
– Help Stabilize  Soil
– Provide Wildlife Refuge
– Protect Water Supplies
– Are more Eco-Friendly

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